May 30, 2017 / Emily / No Comments

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY – NBC is reversing one of the biggest scheduling shake-ups of the year.

After announcing to advertisers earlier this month that its breakout hit This Is Us will move from Tuesdays to Thursdays for its sophomore season this fall, NBC has decided to change its mind.

This Is Us will instead stay right where it is — at Tuesdays at 9 p.m.

Sources say the main reason for the decision change is that the show’s serialized storytelling would have been interrupted by NFL football coverage. Back on Tuesdays, the show will have a continuous run of 9 or 10 episodes. In the first season, NBC didn’t have more than 5 episodes in a row before a pre-emption, so apparently, they want to stick to roll-out plan that clearly is not broken.

Of course, NBC knew about its NFL schedule before the upfronts too, so the reversal is still a bit curious. Fall schedules can and do change between upfronts and the fall, but usually not so quickly or dramatically as this. “We went back and forth about [moving This Is Us to Thursday],” NBC Entertainment Chairman Robert Greenblatt told reporters earlier this month. “There’s a case to be made for keeping the show where it was. While it’s a little risky, there’s a bigger case to be made about redoing Thursday night.”

May 15, 2017 / Emily / No Comments

VARIETY – “This is Us” is making a big move: NBC is moving the hit drama from Tuesdays to Thursday nights as part of a revival of their famous “Must See TV” programming strategy.

If there is one show we could move it would be this one,” explained NBC entertainment chair Bob Greenblatt of the show’s move to 9pm on Thursdays during a conference call with reporters. “There is a case for keeping the show where it was. It’s a little risky, but there’s a bigger case for redoing Thursday nights.”

Greenblatt also outlined extensive creative plans for season two of the drama, which is created by Dan Fogelman. A special edition of the show will air after the Super Bowl, on February 4, 2018. “We thought it was great for the number one sports franchise to be followed by the number one scripted franchise,” said Greenblatt.

The executive producers are also planning a special Christmas episode timed for the holidays, Greenblatt revealed.

Given the new Thursday timeslot, there will be interruptions to the “This Is Us” schedule for NFL games. The show will be on for six weeks, then off again for six weeks. “There will hopefully be some Pittsburgh Steelers games in there,” said Greenblatt,” since the team factors into the show. “I’d love the Steelers to go to the Super Bowl.”

This Is Us” will also face a break for the Olympics in February. “We’ve got some ideas to keep the show alive,” even when the show isn’t on the air, said Greenblatt. “The priority is how can we keep this is us alive as much as humanly possible as long as possible. And that’s what we’re going to try to do even with the interruptions that we’re going to have.”

April 10, 2017 / Emily / No Comments

Hello Milo fans! Yesterday, Milo and his beautiful This Is Us co-star, Mandy Moore talked with Nellie Andreeva about This Is Us. I have added high quality photos of Milo during the green room, presentation panel, and some gorgeous shots in the photo studio to the gallery! Enjoy!

DEADLINE – Stars Milo Ventimiglia and Mandy Moore were among the This Is Us panelists Sunday at Deadline’s The Contenders Emmys event. The series focuses on three adult siblings and their parents, partly in flashbacks, jumping from character to character and between decades. From creator Dan Fogelman, breakout freshman series also stars Sterling K. Brown, Chrissy Metz and Justin Hartley and got an early renewal, picked up for a second and third season in January.

Of course, a major part of making a show that spans many years using the same actors is the makeup. With the help of 12 prosthetic appliances, Moore, playing mom Rebecca Pearson, convincingly ages over a 40-year period.

“It was very important to have the makeup look realistic,” Head of Makeup Zoe Hay said during the panel. “You know, she’s a mom at home, she’s not going to look like a beauty ad in the ’80s.”

But that level of preparation can lead to grueling periods in the chair. “I like to help out with the hairdryer,” Moore said. “Otherwise I’m just sitting there for three to five hours.”

For Ventimiglia, as Rebecca’s husband Jack, facial hair was key to portraying different eras. “With Milo, we referred to beard-gate,” Hay joked. “We had a lot of dialogue about how we would transition him for each period. … We haven’t tried a trucker mustache yet!”

“It’s hard to find the materials these days to go back to the ’70s,” production designer Gary Frutkoff said. “You’ll find a high-end couch or chair, but Dan (Fogelman) from the beginning wanted a very blue-collar look to this family. … We’re always scouring Craigslist and prop houses.”

Frutkoff also said shooting in L.A. had its drawbacks — when depicting Thanksgiving in Pittsburgh, for example. “There’s a small digital budget for removing palm trees,” he said. “I’ve painted grass before. I’ve painted it green and I’ve painted it brown, but [L.A.’s] Griffith Park will not let you touch their grass, so you just have to live with it. When that episode airs, I’m usually at a bar somewhere.”

As for what we can look forward to in Season 2, Ventimiglia said: “There’s a lot happening for all of the Pearsons. Jack and Rebecca need to get their marriage on track because it’s crumbled and fractured.”

Added Moore: “I think some of the answers people are looking for will be at least satisfied and satiated at the beginning of next season.”

March 14, 2017 / Emily / No Comments

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY – The last episode of This Is Us ended on a rather ominous note, as we watched a not-exactly-sober Jack hop in a car, apparently headed to Rebecca’s gig a few hours away to save his marriage. The final episode of This Is Us this season, titled “Moonshadow,” will show you the results of that ill-advised car ride. Will this be the event that sends him to the morgue? Milo Ventimiglia, the man who plays Jack, isn’t saying one way or another, but it sounds like he wants you to at least brace for that possibility when he tells EW: “People want to know what happens with Jack. This may be the time when they find out.”

Or this: “It’s almost like that drink is a bit of a truth serum and a relaxer to the way that he thinks, ‘I’m going to go get my wife back.’ And it’s a poor decision on his part that may lead to his death.”

Or definitely this: “Papa Pearson is very concerned for the audience right now.”

But the season finale — which was co-written by series creator Dan Fogelman and focuses primarily on the Pearson parents — also takes us deep into the past, specifically the year 1972, right before Jack meets Rebecca. “It’s an episode that goes beyond the Jack and Rebecca that we know,” says Ventimiglia.

Indeed, Jack returns from Vietnam and is having trouble making a living, and living at home with his parents. “That was a tough era for Vietnam vets — coming home from war, they weren’t welcomed with open arms,” says Ventimiglia. “A lot of them were spit on, and coming back troubled, having seen some pretty bad things. Even though it may appear that Jack was unscathed by it, I think there’s a deeper understanding to what Jack experienced that we may only see the surface of it and not know what lies beneath. He comes home from a war and ultimately, quietly, there’s a bit of a war at home. It’s no surprise that Jack has had a bad relationship with his father, and that continues.”

Rebecca (Mandy Moore), meanwhile, is pursuing a music career that hasn’t taken off, and she’s facing societal pressures to settle down with a husband. “All of her girlfriends are married, the eye on their prize is meeting marriage material, and Rebecca’s eye is on her music that isn’t quite going the way that she was hoping,” he says. “But at the same time that’s what she’s interested in and that’s where her focus lies…. It’s always about singing and being on a stage for her. “

Ventimiglia hints at a pair of scenes late in the episode that should have fans talking. “They change the game of what the show is,” says Ventimiglia. “They’re two incredibly impactful moments — one’s seeking conflict, and one’s seeking resolution. You may not completely disagree with the conflict, and you may not agree with the resolution, but they sit on complete opposite sides of one another.”

And how would he describe the overall vibe of the episode? “It’s definitely heartbreaking, but it has the Fogelman wink and a smile that will keep you thinking about what just happened. That’s been always the best part about – you can call them cliffhangers — with our show. There might have been only one, where you really have to know what happened, and that was: What happened to Toby? That was the one where you go, ‘Oh my god, I gotta wait four weeks? This is horrible! Screw you people!’ This one feels like it could potentially be a little more reflective. But I don’t think it diminishes the capacity of it in any way.”

Moonshadow” airs Tuesday at 9 p.m. ET/PT on NBC.

March 14, 2017 / Emily / No Comments

USA TODAY – LOS ANGELES — This Is Us fans want to learn the details of Jack Pearson’s death, but Milo Ventimiglia, who plays the husband and father of three, has a different perspective.

Last week, NBC’s hit drama, which jumps between decades to show the Pearson family at various stages of life, hinted at Jack’s demise in a scene from the 1990s. In Tuesday’s first-season finale (9 ET/PT), he and wife Rebecca (Mandy Moore), get the spotlight, toggling between eras.

“Everyone, particularly now, is so focused on when he dies, how he dies, why he dies. I think the opposite. I think you focus on how he lives, why he lives,” Ventimiglia says. “None of us know when we’ll meet our ends. You just have to appreciate life and move positively through life.”

As Ventimiglia, 39, absorbs Jack’s unusual status as a central character who’s long deceased in the present day, the Heroes and Gilmore Girls alum understands the special nature of the critically acclaimed Us. The series, which has brought many viewers to tears with its emotionally charged scenes, received a rare two-season renewal, reflecting its status as TV’s No. 1 new series among young adults.

“With Heroes, it felt like we were there to entertain, whereas This Is Us feels like we’re doing important work,” he says. “When someone approaches me just to talk about how one moment in one episode got them to reach out to their adopted father or connect with their sibling, I feel like we are getting (people) to face themselves and then reflect a little differently.”

Ventimiglia praises Moore for helping to make the Pearsons’ marriage feel real. “Any of the struggle I’ve ever had with (interpreting) Jack, the second I look in Mandy’s eyes, I’m right there with her and I’m him,” he says. “The nice part has just been having Mandy to partner with, shoulder to shoulder, the whole time.”

Because Jack is dead in the present, Ventimiglia hasn’t shared screen time with series regulars Justin Hartley and Chrissy Metz, who play adult versions of his children, Kevin and Kate. (In one episode, he appeared in a hallucination to son Randall, played by Sterling K. Brown.)

“I do miss acting with people from the cast. It’s rare when you have such a talented group of performers assembled with such amazing material,” he says. “But I did a scene with Sterling, so I’m slowly going to rack them up, hopefully, over the entirety of the series.”

Ventimiglia — whose facial hair has been a useful guide to the show’s time jumps — and Moore have acted with infant, child and teen versions of the Pearson kids. Ventimiglia, who’s single and has no children, appreciates the rewards and demands of fatherhood, and he’s assumed a bit of a parental role with the young actors.

“I’m getting to exercise a muscle of fatherhood that I haven’t ever worked out myself,” he says. “I have nieces and nephews I care about. I want them to feel safe and take in all the good sides of life. That’s the way I approach working with these kids.”

Executive producer Ken Olin, who directed the season finale, credits Ventimiglia for providing early insight about “salt of the Earth” Jack, who is less lyrical in speech and expressive emotionally than some other Us characters.

“For Jack, Rebecca was enough, but that’s not who Rebecca is. Rebecca is unsettled and Jack has a certainty. Milo found that in the pilot,” says Olin, who has on- and off-screen expertise with such family dramas as ABC’s thirtysomething and Brothers & Sisters. “This character is so important to the show because he’s different.”

Although Jack is a decent man, whom Ventimiglia modeled on his own father, his family focus squelches his wife’s longtime dream of being a singer. He is hardly supportive when she goes on tour with a band, leaving him to care for their teens. “Jack isn’t jealous so much as he’s protective of his family structure,” Ventimiglia says.

Frustration leads to heavy drinking, a dangerous prelude when Jack decides to drive to his wife’s first tour stop at the end of last week’s episode. His inevitable death — which fans previously learned happens in that 1990s era — was further underlined in a present-day scene in which Kate blames herself for her father’s passing.

To avoid spoiling the finale, Ventimiglia gets philosophical when discussing Jack’s fate and future on a show where characters, including Randall’s biological father, William (Ron Cephas Jones), can die but continue to be seen in another era.

“I always go back to: The answer is going to reveal itself when it’s supposed to,” he says. “Even when we discover how Jack died, it doesn’t mean his story is ending, which is a nice thing about the show. There is no real end.”

January 18, 2017 / Emily / No Comments

Milo recently did a photoshoot and interview with The Wrap. You can check out some amazing portraits in the gallery and watch the interview video below!

THE WRAP – Milo Ventimiglia knows one of the biggest secrets of NBC’s “This Is Us”: When and how his fan-favorite character Jack is going to die.

But just because we already know Jack Pearson will suffer an untimely fate, that doesn’t mean the character is going anywhere.

“I do know when you’re going to know, but just wait,” he told TheWrap’s Stuart Brazell. “You may get some teasers as to when, very soon. But I think the thing to know is that Jack’s time with his family is limited. But he’s not going anywhere because Jack and Rebecca are in the past, and reflect very much how they impact the Big Three in the present day. I think it’s safe to say that Jack will be around for the life of the show.”

That doesn’t mean it’s going to be smooth sailing for the Pearsons, of course, on this show known for its shocking twists and turns. Ventimiglia revealed the last 13 episodes of Season 1 are going to be even more of a roller coaster.

“We have another episode coming up, next week… some bombs are dropped,” he previewed. “Then we come back for 13 and I think a lot happens. It’s one of those things where it gets a pace, and then it just moves faster and faster going into that very, very explosive end of Episode 18.”

“This Is Us” airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. ET on NBC.